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Living With Nature Full Season Schedule

 

TUCSON Click on the name of the speaker for a biography

September 20
Vulture: The Private Life of an Unloved Bird with Katie Fallon

Vultures are often overlooked, underappreciated, and unloved, despite the vital role they play healthy ecosystems. Worldwide, vultures are more likely to be threatened or endangered than any other group of raptor, but in the United States turkey and black vultures may be increasing in number. Based on Katie Fallon’s new book, this presentation will discuss the life and times of the noble turkey vulture, including its feeding, nesting, and roosting habits, migratory behaviors, and common misconceptions.

October 7
Planting hope: landscaping with native plants to benefit birds with John Rowden

Audubon’s Bird-friendly Communities conservation strategy is guided by the principle of improving communities all over the country by providing birds with food, shelter, safe passage and places to raise their young. Native plants provide resources that support birds in each of those areas, and research is demonstrating that even small patches of habitat planted with natives – down to the yard and neighborhood scale – can benefit birds. In 2016, Audubon introduced the nationwide Plants for Birds program that provides resources and support, with the goal of helping people put native plants in the ground in gardens, yards, and community spaces. John Rowden will summarize the benefits that native plants provide to birds and explore the resources we have developed to support the planting of natives, with a particular focus on the desert southwest. Planting native species is something everyone can do that can have tangible benefits for birds. Our program begins with an advocacy update from Dinah Bear

November 11
The Wonder of Hummingbirds with Steve Vaughan

As a biologist and a photographer, our guest speaker Steve looks at hummingbirds through two different lenses. From his biologist perspective, he is fascinated by how much we know about hummingbirds. However, as a photographer spending time with these fascinating creatures he realizes how little we actually understand. Stephen will be sharing some of his favorite hummingbird photographs and his experiences with these feathered jewels.

January 18, 2018
Urban Wildlife Rehabilitation
with Robin Motzer

We are fortunate to have a diversity of wildlife in Arizona, and in America. As human population grows and people move in to uninhabited places, wildlife lose their habitats. And as climate changes, wildlife is forced to find a new home that is not already claimed by predators, creating an increase in conflicts with humans and animals. Unfortunately, when wildlife is perceived as a nuisance, they can be killed. This approach has led to a decline in some species, especially with large predators like coyotes and bobcats and creates imbalances in the ecosystem, when they are no longer a part of nature’s equilibrium. Trying to eradicate coyotes creates a domino effect of issues including filling the void, increasing number of pups and the food chain imbalance.  Healthier ecosystems benefit us all. Finding ways to prevent conflicts without lethal control is in the best interest of wildlife and humans alike.Learn harmonious coexist tips and stories to help make better choices in what and how we consume and to help us coexist with other species on our planet. Note: Due to the stress placed on animals when going off-site, Tucson Wildlife Center does not bring them to talks and presentations

February 12
Arizona Climate: Past, Present, and Future with Mike Crimmins

Despite its notoriety as a dusty and dry place, Arizona possesses an exceptional diversity in landscapes and vegetation.  Its dramatic topographic features and geographic position bring a range of temperatures and precipitation equivalent to the range experienced between Mexico and Canada.  Topographic features create steep gradients in temperature and precipitation that support ecological community types from mixed conifer at high elevations to desert scrub at lowest elevations. Two ‘wet’ seasons can bring precipitation in torrential downpours (summer monsoon) or light snow showers (winter storms) with major implications on how and where water important to plants is stored in the soil. Longer-term cycles in Pacific Ocean temperatures can impact storm tracks across Arizona, bringing multi-year wet periods and long-term droughts. Major changes in the global climate system have been observed in recent decades that have directly impacted Arizona’s complex climate. This presentation will explore historical patterns and mechanisms driving climate variability across Arizona and how they may be impacted in a changing climate.

March 20
How You can Make a Difference for Native Wildlife with Maddox Wolfe and Charlene Westgate

Did you know that you can provide critical habitat for Arizona’s wildlife in your own backyard? By planting native flowering plants, trees, and shrubs, you can become part of the growing movement to create pockets of habitat within the city that are essential to the survival of our native birds, butterflies, bees, and more! Join Maddox and Charlene for an informative panel discussion about Tucson Audubon Society’s new public program, Habitat at Home and permaculture landscape design.

Register to attend this talk at REI

April 5
Rattlesnakes Abroad with Héctor Ávila-Villegas

Herpetologist Hector Avila grew up in central Mexico, roaming in the Chihuahuan Desert, where he learned about wildlife at an early age. During this talk, Avila will share his conservation insight and experience as it relates to an undervalued group of animals: rattlesnakes. His new book “Rattlesnake: between danger and conservation” is the first in its type in Mexico, combining scientific information with field observations and select photography. Published by the Mexican Commission on Biodiversity, this book is the end result of many years of work from groundbreaking field research of a ‘rattle-less’ rattlesnake endemic to Santa Catalina Island in the Gulf of California, a specialization at the Venoms Study Center in Brazil, and extensive literature review.

Doors at 6 p.m., presentation at 6:30 p.m. Click for Registration

May 14
Extra-pair Mating in Tree Swallows

Faithless Philandering or Cunning Cuckoldry?

presented by Dr. Kelly Hallinger

For centuries, birds have been regarded as paragons of monogamy. The past 30 years, however, have cast their unfettered fidelity in a remarkably different light. New molecular genetic techniques have given researchers an unobstructed look at the private lives of birds and resulted in the startling discovery that cuckoldry is common, occurring in more than 75% of all species studied to date. Why promiscuous mating should be so common in the avian world remains an unanswered and contentious question. In this seminar, Kelly will introduce several hypotheses that have been put forward to explain the high incidence of promiscuous mating in birds. Then we get to delve into a detailed examination of one of these hypotheses using data from a long-studied population of Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) breeding in New York. Doors at 6 p.m., presentation at 6:30 p.m. Click for Registration

GREEN VALLEY Click on the name of the speaker for a biography

October 7
Saving Santa Ana (Again) with Dinah Bear

Santa Ana National Wildlife Refuge, often described as the “crown jewel of the national wildlife refuge system” is under immediate threat as the result of a decision that the first new border wall construction will occur there.  The plans would leave the entire Refuge, except for the visitor’s center, on the south side of the wall, between a 40 foot wall and the Rio Grande River, subject to massive flooding, cleared vegetation, lighting, and other threats.  Sadly, this may proceed even if Congress does not appropriate new funding for the larger border wall.  Our speaker is Dinah Bear who has recently visited the Refugee and works with a number of organizations trying to save the Refuge, will explain why Santa Ana must be saved, the nature of the threats, and what you can do about it.

November 4
Amazing Hummingbirds! with Karen Krebbs

As we continue Tucson Audubon Society’s Year of the Hummingbird, join us to learn hummingbird facts and fun! Karen has been studying hummingbirds for 30 years and will share her knowledge on hummingbird identification, entertaining behavior, nesting biology, and ways to attract these tiny jewels to your garden and home.

December 2
How You can Make a Difference for Native Wildlife with Maddox Wolfe and Charlene Westgate

Did you know that you can provide critical habitat for Arizona’s wildlife in your own backyard? By planting native flowering plants, trees, and shrubs, you can become part of the growing movement to create pockets of habitat within the city that are essential to the survival of our native birds, butterflies, bees, and more! Join Maddox and Charlene for an informative panel discussion about Tucson Audubon Society’s new public program, Habitat at Home and permaculture landscape design.

January 6, 2018
Living with Urban Wildlife with Robin Motzer 

Tips, facts and safety on living with wildlife. Sometimes people don’t always know the best approach to dealing with animals, and other times misinformation is to blame. How you, your neighbors, and your community can help wildlife and coexist peacefully. Learn tips on how to take a diplomatic, friendly approach to educating your neighbors who may not know the best approach to harmoniously live with wildlife, and how to make them more receptive to changing their behavior. Includes: How to rescue an injured, ill or orphaned wildlife; Desert wildlife facts and frequently asked questions; and Humans are animals too. Note: Due to the stress placed on animals when going off-site, Tucson Wildlife Center does not bring them to talks and presentations.

February 3
Counting Cuckoos – Three Years of Searching the Sky Islands with Jennie MacFarland

Secretive and often hunkered down motionlessly behind dense foliage, the Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo is not easy to detect unless you hear its loud “Kowlp” call.’ – National Parks Service

Join Tucson Audubon’s bird conservation biologist, Jennie MacFarland, as she talks about her experiences and discusses new data gathered by Tucson Audubon’s team of staff and volunteer surveyors who have also hunkered down motionless behind dense foliage to spot the Western Yellow-billed Cuckoo. Jennie spoke on this subject at the Friends of Tucson Audubon Society’s annual membership event in December 2017, if you missed her fun and informative talk here is another chance. Doors at 9:00 a.m, program at 10 a.m. Coffee available.

March 3
Living in Rattlesnake Countrywith Michael Cardwell

Southern Arizona is home to a greater variety of venomous reptiles than anyplace else in America. While Gila monsters and coralsnakes only rarely cause significant injury, encounters with rattlesnakes are far more common and, while seldom fatal, their bites often produce serious injuries that sometimes result in permanent disabilities – not to mention enormous medical bills. During this program, you will learn how to safely tell rattlesnakes apart from harmless look-alikes, avoid the two human activities that produce almost all rattlesnake bites, recognize symptoms of a rattlesnake bite and provide the most up-to-date first aid. Plus, some common rattlesnake myths will be busted, as well.

April 14 (NOTE date change)
Nestboxes: Building a future for our birds with Olya Phillips

Many cavity-nesting birds like American Kestrels, Ash-throated Flycatchers, Lucy’s Warblers—and many other species—suffer from loss of habitat, especially in Arizona’s expanding urban centers. The lack of mature trees means fewer nesting cavities for them to use for breeding. Tucson Audubon’s Citizen Science Coordinator, Olya Phillips, is going to talk about the conservation importance of urban nest boxes and what Tucson Audubon is doing to increase nesting sites for our cavity-nesting birds. Learn what you can do to attract these birds to your Green Valley home!

ORO VALLEY Click on the name of the speaker for a biography

January 20
What to Do When You Encounter Wildlife with Robin Motzer

Tips, facts and safety on living with wildlife.  Sometimes people don’t always know the best approach to dealing with animals, and other times misinformation is to blame. How you, your neighbors, and your community can help wildlife and coexist peacefully.  Learn tips on how to take a diplomatic, friendly approach to educating your neighbors who may not know the best approach to harmoniously live with wildlife, and how to make them more receptive to changing their behavior. Includes: How to rescue an injured, ill or orphaned wildlife; Desert wildlife facts and frequently asked questions; Humans are animals too.
Note: Due to the stress placed on recuperating animals when going off-site, Tucson Wildlife Center does not bring them to talks and presentations.

February 17
The Exciting Night Life of Bats! with Karen Krebbs

Learn about an amazing and unique nocturnal mammal and how it has become so successful as a predator and a pollinator.There are more than 1,100 species of bats occurring worldwide. As an important part of our ecosystems, bats deserve our respect and admiration. Echolocation allows a bat to fly in total darkness to locate,chase, and capture flying insects. Bridges and other human structures are important roost habitat for many species of bats, and nectar-feeding bats travel to southeastern Arizona annually to pollinate columnar cactus and succulents.

Our presenter, Karen Krebbs, has studied bats for more than 30 years, working initially with the Arizona-Sonoran Desert museum, and now independently, as author, animal-handler trainer, and bat researcher. You will find her passion for these mighty mammals is contagious! A live bat guest will be presented to us at the end of this talk.

To attend this Living with Nature program call 520-622-6014 WNPA one week before (space is limited to 60 seats per lecture).

March 17
How to Identify Birds of Prey with Steve Vaughan

Birds of prey can be challenging to identify. Here is an opportunity to learn some simple characteristics to help you identify these birds. Steve Vaughan is a professional photographer and ornithologist that has put together some formulas to guide you through this process. This program will be followed up with a field trip to the Tubac Hawk watch on Sunday, March 18

To attend this Living with Nature program – call 520-622-6014 WNPA one week before (space is limited to 60 seats per lecture).
Stephen Vaughan 719-649-8741 StephenHVaughan@Gmail.com

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Tucson Audubon Society
300 E University Blvd. #120 Tucson, AZ 85705

Mason Center
3835 W Hardy Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85742

Paton Center for Hummingbirds
477 Pennsylvania Ave.
Patagonia, AZ 85624
520 415-6447

color_square_face_right

Tucson Audubon Society
300 E University Blvd. #120
Tucson, AZ 85705

Mason Center
3835 W Hardy Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85742

Paton Center for Hummingbirds
477 Pennsylvania Ave.
Patagonia, AZ 85624
520 415-6447