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Birds & Community Events

Join a Virtual Social Event or Class using the Zoom video conferencing platform.

After you register, your link to join the Zoom social/class will be sent to you the day before. If you have any questions about using Zoom, please contact Luke Safford.

Tuesday, January 19, 11am–12pm
Presentation: Bird-safe Building Program Launch| Host: Olya Phillips
Register Here
Join us as we introduce another great program to help birds in Southeast Arizona. An astonishing 365 million to 1 billion birds die from window collisions every year in the US alone. The majority of these strikes happen in residential areas. Tucson and Southeast Arizona are joining the ranks of other cities in employing the collision prevention program through Tucson Audubon’s Bird-safe Buildings initiative. We are addressing both residential window strike prevention as well as dangers posed by large commercial buildings. Currently no such program exists here, leaving birds entering our major migration flyway vulnerable. Learn more about our program plan and what you can do starting in your own homes!

Thursday, January 21, 12pm–1pm
Presentation: Engaging Youth through Citizen Science in Southern Arizona’s National Parks | Host: Elise Dillingham
Register Here
The National Park Services is integrating youth citizen scientists into cutting-edge natural and cultural research efforts across southern Arizona’s national parks. Youth are supporting wildlife studies, vegetation monitoring, hydrological surveys, and cultural resource preservation experiments. Learn about the National Park Service’s Desert Research Learning Center and Sonoran Desert Network and ways they are engaging youth through science in partnership with Tucson Audubon Society.

Monday, January 25, 7pm – 8pm
Birds ‘n’ Beer–”Rare Birds in Southeast Arizona” | Host: Luke Safford
Register Here
Enjoy your favorite drink and connect with your Tucson Audubon friends. Every month brings some new, rare birds to our region and this past month was no different! Maybe some of you have been lucky enough to locate a few of these species and you’ll be invited to share your story and a picture if you have one.

Tuesday, January 26, 11am–12pm
Presentation: The Science of Species Recovery: Can Wild Masked Bobwhite Quail Persist in the Wild? | Hosts: Lacrecia Johnson, Rebecca Chester, & Don Wolfe
Register Here
The Masked Bobwhite Quail, Colinus virginianus ridgwayi, was believed to be extinct in the wild until 1964 when a wild population was discovered in Sonora Mexico. Birds from that population and from previously established captive populations became forebears of the Masked Bobwhite Quail that are reared for release on Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge. Species reintroduction and restoration is only possible with significant scientific research and experimentation. Lacrecia Johnson, Rebecca Chester, biologists from US Fish and Wildlife Service and Don Wolfe, Senior Biologist at Sutton Avian Center, will tell us about efforts to establish a sustainable wild population of Masked Bobwhite on Buenos Aires NWR.

Thursday, January 28, 11am–12 pm
CLASS: Birding the Calendar–Where to Go Birding in February | Instructor: Luke Safford
Register Here
One of the most common questions we get asked is “When is the best time to go birding in Southeast Arizona?” Well, it’s hard to pinpoint a best month, because there is something unique during every season! In this session we’ll look at February, the last month of “winter” birding here in Tucson.

Tuesday, February 2, 1pm–2pm
Presentation: Bald Eagles: Back from the brink, but in trouble again | Presenter: Ed Clark, Co-founder and President of the Wildlife Center of Virginia
Register Here
The bald eagle is one of our nation’s most dramatic conservation success stories. After choosing the bald eagle as the symbol of the United States in 1782, we systematically shot, poisoned and persecuted these spectacular predators, driving them to the very brink of extinction. In the early 1970’s as the flagship species of the new movement to protect endangered wildlife, the bald eagle began a slow and difficult recovery. Today there are believed to be as many or more eagles in many parts of the country as there were in precolonial times. However there is a new environmental threat that is once again taking a toll on bald eagles—lead. Fragments of spent hunting ammunition in being consumed by scavenging eagles, killing thousands each year….and it’s totally preventable.

Ed Clark is co-founder and President of the Wildlife Center of Virginia, one of the world’s leading hospitals for wildlife. Since 1982, the Wildlife Center has treated more than 70,000 patients, presented educational programs to nearly 2 million children and adults, and trained veterinary and conservation professionals from more than forty countries around the world. Ed is an acknowledged expert on non-profit management and fundraising. He is also a well-known television personality, having hosted several series, including Wildlife Emergency, on Animal Planet, and Virginia Outdoors on Virginia Public Television.

Thursday, February 4, 11am–12 pm
CLASS: Tips on Identifying Birds | Instructor: Luke Safford
Register Here
Have you ever spotted an interesting bird only to become frustrated because you can’t figure out what kind of species it is? We’ve all been there! Let’s move from being frustrated to finding enjoyment in the process of identification. We’ll look at a few tricky bird families for important characteristics to key in on and we’ll finish up with some photos of harder to identify birds and work through the process together. You are encouraged to send pictures to Luke ahead of time to be used in the class!

Tuesday, February 9, 11am–12pm
Presentation: Lucy’s Warblers and Nestboxes| Host: Olya Phillips
Register Here
Lucy’s Warblers are one of only two cavity nesting warblers in the United States. They’re also the only warbler to nest in the lowland desert. While many secondary cavity nesting species have been helped with the use of nestboxes, there has been a long held misconception that Lucy’s Warblers will not use nestboxes. Tucson Audubon set out to test that notion and discovered a nestbox design that Lucy’s Warblers love. Join us to learn more about our research journey and how you can be a part of the Lucy’s Warbler Nestbox project!

Thursday, February 11, 11am–12pm
Workshop: Making Your Birdathon the Best | Host: Luke Safford
Register Here
Our annual Birdathon is a great opportunity to enjoy birds while raising or donating critical funds for Tucson Audubon; it’s like a walkathon, but instead of counting miles we count birds! Join Luke Safford as he’ll share his Birdathon tips and stories, help you develop some creative ideas, and answer any questions you might have as you get started on your Birdathon adventure.

Tuesday, February 16, 1pm–2pm
Presentation: Hawaii’s Birds on the Brink | Host: Mandy Talpas
Register Here
Hawaii is a world renown paradise and natural wonderland with lush rainforests, tropical coral reefs, snowcapped summits, and barren lava flows. Among Hawaii’s diverse habitats are some of the most unique and rare birds in the world. Although Hawaii once boasted over 140 endemic birds, only 44 remain, 33 of them are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act, and 10 of them haven’t been seen in decades. Mandy Talpas, a local guide and conservationist, invites you to learn about Hawaii’s beautiful birds battling extinction and the projects in place to help save them.

Friday, February 19, 11am–12pm
Class: Birding the Calendar–Where to Go Birding in March | Instructor: Luke Safford
Register Here
One of the most common questions we get asked is “When is the best time to go birding in Southeast Arizona?” Well, it’s hard to pinpoint a best month, because there is something unique during every season! In this session we’ll look at the month of March when we can start to expect returning Bell’s Vireos, Lucy’s Warblers, and migrating Common Black Hawks.

Saturday, February 20, 10am–11am
Workshop: Making Your Birdathon the Best | Host: Luke Safford
Register Here
Our annual Birdathon is a great opportunity to enjoy birds while raising or donating critical funds for Tucson Audubon; it’s like a walkathon, but instead of counting miles we count birds! Join Luke Safford as he’ll share his Birdathon tips and stories, help you develop some creative ideas, and answer any questions you might have as you get started on your Birdathon adventure.

Monday, February 22, 7pm – 8pm
Birds ‘n’ Beer–”Rare Birds in Southeast Arizona” | Host: Luke Safford
Register Here
Enjoy your favorite drink and connect with your Tucson Audubon friends. Every month brings some new, rare birds to our region and this past month was no different! Maybe some of you have been lucky enough to locate a few of these species and you’ll be invited to share your story and a picture if you have one.

Thursday, March 4, 11am–12:30pm
Workshop: Identification of Southeast Arizona’s Spring Migrant Raptors | Instructor: Homer Hansen
$25/person, Register Here
The riparian corridors of southeast Arizona have been discovered as excellent places to view migrating raptors as they return from their wintering grounds. Spring is one of the best times of year to see large concentrations of raptors, especially some of the southwest “specialties” like the Common Black Hawk, Gray Hawk, and Zone-tailed Hawk. The identification presentation will commence with an introduction to key terminology and recognition of the GISS, or shape and form, of raptors by species and genera, then will delve into the identification of our migrating raptors. This presentation is not intended to be all inclusive, rather it will focus on the plumages and nuances of the “top 10” raptors you could see.

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Tucson Audubon Society
300 E University Blvd. #120 Tucson, AZ 85705

Mason Center
3835 W Hardy Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85742

Paton Center for Hummingbirds
477 Pennsylvania Ave.
Patagonia, AZ 85624
520 415-6447

color_square_face_right

Tucson Audubon Society
300 E University Blvd. #120
Tucson, AZ 85705

Mason Center
3835 W Hardy Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85742

Paton Center for Hummingbirds
477 Pennsylvania Ave.
Patagonia, AZ 85624
520 415-6447

color_square_face_right

Tucson Audubon Society
300 E University Blvd. #120
Tucson, AZ 85705

Mason Center
3835 W Hardy Rd.
Tucson, AZ 85742

Paton Center for Hummingbirds
477 Pennsylvania Ave.
Patagonia, AZ 85624
520 415-6447